Honey Sweet Flow Hive

This is hands-down
THE BEST NEW HIVE INVENTION
since the honey extractor!

Over 10 years of research have gone into this product
to ensure you are as happy as your bees will be.

 

Easy on the bees – Easy on you!  


Less work, more honey – happiness all aroun
d!
This is my dream hive and it’s on my
“gotta-get-this” list for 2-do’s this year!
I bought mine recently ~ It is lovely.
I will have more info about my beekeeping adventures soon.

Back to the Flow Hive:

Manufactured in the USA and Australia – you could have your hive shipped within 3 days of your order and on your doorstep quicker that the honeybee flies!

Link to Special Sale Price

Learn more about the Flow Hive, how it works and why it is the best hive for the backyard gardener or the serious beekeeper:

http://

I think this system is revolutionary and will be a great blessing to the backyard beekeeper and for those who extract honey as a profession. 

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Beekeeping 101: 5 Things to Do Before Your Bees Arrive

I still dream of Beekeeping  – if you do to, then locate your local beekeeping chapter in your area.
http://www.beeculture.com/directory/find-local-beekeeper/
Beekeeping 101: 5 Things to Do Before Your Bees Arrive
http://homereadyhome.com/beekeeping-101-5-things-to-do/

Thinking about getting bees? A At the time of this post, I’ve just finished installing the last of three packages of bees. There are two hives at our mountain house and one at the community garden in town. Here are my girls down at the garden…

It’s exciting!! I just know you’re going to love beekeeping, too. However, to get to this point, there are some important steps you need to take. And to make it easier for you, let me share what I’ve learned so far. Consider it a little Beekeeping 101.

Before you pick up bees from a supplier, there are five things you need to do:
1. Ask yourself important questions.

Why do you want to keep bees? Examine your motivation for getting into beekeeping. Do you just want bees to pollinate your garden or are you hoping to become a honey distributor?

Are you allergic to bee stings? There’s really no way around it. You will get stung at some point. Some swelling, itching and redness are normal reactions to bee stings, however a small percentage of people will have a life threatening allergic reaction. If you or someone in your family has a severe bee sting allergy, this probably isn’t the hobby for you. If you’re unsure whether or not you’re allergic, it’s a good idea to get tested by an allergist.

Are you committed to beekeeping?
Beekeeping isn’t considered a time intensive hobby, but during your first year, you will inspecting your hives frequently, as this will help you learn more about your bees. Also, be realistic about the time you have. Don’t go all out and start with more hives than you can manage.

What will your neighbors think?
If your neighbors are opposed to your new hobby, you may just need to explain basic beekeeping to get them to come around. For example, the community garden where my bees are located is on a church’s property. (A church with a weekday preschool program!) It took a little educating and some convincing but ultimately the bees won. If your neighbors are so against your bees and are making your life miserable, you may have to find a different location for the bees or not get started in beekeeping at all.

2. Get educated.

Start by reading books and watching videos about beekeeping. The best books I’ve read are Beekeeping for Dummies by Howland Blackiston and Kim Flottum’s The Backyard Beekeeper.

Then, take a class. Call your local Cooperative Extension and ask about beekeeping classes or google beekeeper associations in your state. Most associations offer a beginner beekeeper class and some will even pair you with a mentor once you complete the class.

Also, educate yourself on the local ordinances. Check with your town or city government and find out if beekeeping allowed. In some places, it’s illegal to have hives (usually in urban communities). Other communities allow hives, but have a restriction on the number allowed. And some places require you to register as a beekeeper or obtain a permit.

3. Order your bees early.

Yes, that’s right. Ordering your bees is on the list of things to do before your bees arrive because if you don’t order early enough, there’s a good chance you may not have bees arriving at all!

At the bee school I attended, the instructor handed out a list of recommended bee suppliers on the first night (another benefit to taking a class) and said, “Order your bees now.” Yikes! I still hadn’t completely made up my mind if I wanted to get into beekeeping and now, I had to order bees!?! But, the students who didn’t follow his advice were out of luck. The suppliers ran out of bees.

The best time of year to get bees is early spring but you need to place your order well ahead. During the winter, usually 4 months or so before spring delivery dates, contact your supplier and get your order in.

4. Buy beekeeping equipment.

There are several different styles of hives. The most common hive is the Langstroth hive. All the equipment suppliers will sell the components for the Langstroth but not all manufacturers’ equipment matches. It’s best to choose a supplier you like and stick with them. (Both books I mentioned above list the names and contact info for equipment suppliers.) I purchased my hives from brushymountainbeefarm.com. They were super patient and helpful answering all my beginner questions. Also, they make it easier for beginners by offering 8 or 10-frame beginner kits, and of course, you can always order items separately.

Either way, here is the equipment you need for a Langstroth hive:

  • hive bottom board
  • hive body (Also called a brood box or deep super. Another option is to use two medium supers instead of one deep. They are easier to handle when full of bees and honey.)
  • shallow super
  • inner cover
  • telescoping top
  • 9 1/8” frames (I prefer pre-assembled frames.)
  • 5 3/8” frames (I prefer pre-assembled frames.)
  • 8 1/2” crimp wire wax foundation
  • 4 3/4” crimp wire wax foundation
  • entrance reducer
  • entrance feeder (or another feeder of your choice)
  • hive tool
  • bee brush
  • smoker
  • veil
  • gloves
  • jacket or full bee protection suit

You’ll also need a hive stand to get your hive up off the ground. Cinderblocks are a good inexpensive option and pallets work as well.

Here’s a video that shows you how all the equipment fits together…

https://www.youtube.com/embed/WWLsaPjGws4“>http://

5. Set up your hive.

If you didn’t purchase pre-painted boxes, then the first thing you need to do is paint the outside of the hive body, telescoping top (wood only) and bottom board with an exterior latex paint or a natural sealant.

Next, install the wax foundation on your frames. Watch this video to see how it’s done:
https://www.youtube.com/embed/XqvsCGRHE84“>http://
Then, ready your location to receive bees. Don’t wait until the package of bees is in your hands before you get all the location logistics worked out because things rarely go as planned. Decide on the best place for your hive and set up the hive stand. Gather all your equipment and have it ready. And it doesn’t hurt to practice lighting your smoker once or twice before the big day.

If you’re just getting started in beekeeping, I’d love to hear from you!
What questions do you have? What have you learned so far? Tell me how it’s going for you in the comments below.